Let’s Read The Wise Man’s Fear ch. 136-137

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CHAPTER ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-Six

Interlude—Close to Forgetting

You know what this story needs? A little padding.

Kvothe cajoles Bast into going off to the funeral of Whoever who died in the last book, or maybe it was this book. Time has ceased to hold any meaning and the void surrounds me.

After he’s gone Chronicler and Kvothe have some banter and Kvothe grins and nods a lot.

“That’s terribly kind of you,” Chronicler said, relaxing a bit. “I’ll admit I wasn’t looking forward to spending an hour grinding tonight.

You need to get away from the MMOs man, they’re more trouble than they’re worth.

(He’s actually talking about making ink)

Chronicler asks why the sword Kvothe has hanging on the wall doesn’t match the description of the one he got from the Adem and Kvothe explains that it’s a different sword.

Kvothe laughed a rich warm laugh. The sound of it tumbled around the room, and for a moment the inn didn’t feel empty at all.

This book is like a rollercoaster that lurches constantly between gritty gritty grimdark and twee merriment. One minute Kvothe is hacking bandits to pieces with dark magic and the next he’s strolling naked through fairyland with his lute firmly in hand.

“These will be a nice surprise for Bast.” Kvothe grinned at Chronicler

[…]

Kvothe returned after several minutes with his apron wrapped into a bundle. He was spattered with rain and his hair was in wild disarray. He wore a boyish grin

In The Wise Man’s Fear alone characters are described as grinning over 150 times. No really, I counted.

Just when the twee is about to reach terminal levels two soldiers come stomping in. Kvothe’s exceedingly young age actually gets acknowledged here, as one of the soldiers calls him “boy” and tells him to get the owner. Of course this is just making me imagine Kvothe as a 25 year old and only draws more attention to the fact that he acts like he’s 50.

The two soldiers have “taken the king’s coin” and so only have a really big gold piece with them that no one can give them change for. That…. seems kind of goofy and weird but okay. Kvothe of course has enough money, because Kvothe must always be the most impressive person in the room. Unfortunately the two soldiers are actually there to rob him, oh oh!

“This hain’t got nothing to do with you, either,” he said grimly, his beard waggling as he spoke.

“Grim” and “waggle” are two words that don’t really belong in the same sentence together.

Also that’s such terrible writing.

Needless to say Kvothe decides to fight instead of handing over he money.

Before the soldier could do more than shake his head, Kvothe stepped forward and calmly kicked him in the shoulder.

Why on Earth would you ever kick someone in the shoulder in a real fight? Do you have any idea how hard that would be to pull off?

Anyway Kvothe manages to flatten the first soldier but the second one catches him off guard and starts pummeling him. I guess being an innkeeper instead of an awesome dude who everyone loves has drained Kvothe’s fighting powers as well as his magic. He gets beaten up for a bit then the two soldiers steal his purse and leave.

In any other book I’d suspect this was an indication that Kvothe had been massively exaggerating his fighting prowess in his stories, but since it’s Rothfuss I’m really not sure. Part of me suspects he is actually going to pull a twist like this since it would see oh so clever and Rothfuss sure does like to be oh so clever, but like I’ve said before that wouldn’t in any way excuse the long, tedious two-volume build-up.

Bast comes in and is naturally shocked that two ordinary non-Gary Stus beat him up.

Kvothe let his arms fall heavily to his sides. “Quit expecting me to be something I’m not,” he said, still breathing hard.

He might have some expectation about your fighting ability because you just got done explaining at length about how much of a badass you are. Just a thought.

Once again the book insists on pointing out contradictions and plot holes that I wouldn’t actually have noticed on my own, as Bast asks how Kvothe defeated all the spider-crabs the day before yesterday but couldn’t take down two ordinary guys. Kvothe waves this away by saying he “picked the time and place” of the spider-crab fight, whatever that means. Come to think of it we didn’t actually see that fight, so maybe Kvothe used some sort of unknown ability or power he’s reluctant to talk about.

Kvothe insists on going back to the story, saying his injuries are no big deal.

“I’m not concussed, Bast,” Kvothe said, irritated. “I’ve got four broken ribs,

Uh, yeah, that is actually kind of a big deal. I don’t know where writers got this idea that broken ribs are a minor flesh wound you’ll sleep off the next day. They make breathing extremely painful and can actually puncture your diaphragm and shit. Multiple rib fractures (like say four rib fractures) can result in something lovely called “flail chest”, a life threatening condition that often requires a ventilator to treat.

Seriously, a broken rib is “holy shit get to the hospital right now” time, not “ah it’s fine”. At the very least Kvothe should be in agony right now. I get the feeling a lot of writers have never broken bones before and don’t realize how painful it is (really really fucking painful).

Anyway Bast performs a mildly creepy magic spell thing to heal Kvothe’s injured tooth that involves basically taking the injury on himself (one of those rare bursts of creativity we’ve been seeing in the book) and then it’s story time again.

CHAPTER ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SEVEN

Questions

Mercifully the journey back to Severen is skipped over in the space of a page or so. Kvothe rushes as fast as possible before news of what happened with the bandits overtakes him and he winds up arrested. Not sure how that would happen since everyone in town seemed to have decided he was a hero by the end of it, but in these books rumours appears to be transmitted telepathically at roughly the same speed that fiber optic cables transmit data so I guess he has to hurry.

Kvothe arrives back at the Mayor’s pad, setting the iron gibbet we were told about ten thousand years ago.

The sight of the bleached bones in the iron cage did not ease my amdeties. The Maer had put a man in there for simple banditry. What might he do to someone who had slaughtered nine traveling players on the road?

Dude, everyone who witnessed or knows about the incident is going to testify that they were evil rapist bandits, I think you’ll be fine.

Stapes (man this brings back fond memories of my childhood, when we were on the Vint bit) tells Kvothe that the Mayor got married while he was gone. Oh and remember that hanging plot thread with Caudicus, the assassin doctor who vowed to come back and finish the job? Turns out the Mayor’s men tracked him down and killed him while Kvothe was gone. Yes, just like that.

He killed four of the Maer’s personal guard and cost Dagon an eye.

The power level of wizards in this book is all over the place. Back at wizard school I got the impression that just manipulating the heat of a candle was quite an achievement, but now we’ve got Kvothe and Dagon blowing multiple people away with magic, and neither of them have access to powers that other wizards don’t. It really is like this book is composed of multiple often wildly different drafts written over a long time period stuck awkwardly together.

I smiled. “Tell him it’s a wedding present.”

Stapes took hold of the box, smiling. “I’m sure he’ll be delighted.”

He smiled smilingly as he handed over the box, smiling.

Such bad writing.

Kvothe has to go meet the Mayor but he can’t yet because he’s really dirty from travelling so he needs to postpone the meeting PADDING PADDING PADDING can you believe we’re actually approaching the end of this thing?

The Mayor is like “I’m totally coming lol” and then he just leaves Kvothe waiting all say to troll him

The fact that I couldn’t make my way down to Severen-Low to look for Denna was a vast irritation as well.

You already fucking know she left months ago. And why is it so important that you find her now, when you’ve been sitting on your arse faffing around and barely thinking of her up to this point?

Bredon (it’s okay if you can’t remember who that is, don’t bother looking it up) swings round to twinkle at Kvothe merrily and be like “hey I heard someone boned Felurian wonder who that could be by the way that sure is a very fae-like cloak you have there” and also shares some interesting gossip.

The royal court in Renere was busy too. The Prince Regent Alaitis had been killed in a duel, sending much of the southern farrel into chaos as various nobility did their best to capitalize on the death of such a highly ranked member of the court.

I swear to God this better not be going where I think it’s going.

Kvothe ambles around with the Mayor making small talk .

“I have always thought,” Alveron said at last, introducing the topic of our discussion, “that everyone has a question that rests in the center of who they are.”

Oh for fuck’s sake.

After some waffling the Mayor wants to swap Great Centre Identity Questions or whatever the fuck.

I could hardly hope for better encouragement than that. I thought for a moment, choosing my words carefully. “Where are the Amyr?”

Are you fucking serious? Kvothe was farting around Vintas having endless conversations with the Mayor and he’s only now getting around to asking about this? I am literally astonished with how badly plotted these books are. Kvothe just wanders around from side-quest to side-quest until he either randomly remembers what he was supposed to be doing or has the next chunk of information dumped on him. This isn’t how you write a story. I’ve seen amateur fiction better then this. Hell I could write a better fantasy story then this.

Anyway, we don’t actually get any more information except that like Kvothe the Mayor went looking for information about the Amyr when he was younger, like Kvothe he didn’t find anything and like Kvothe he came to the conclusion that the Amyr themselves had expunged the records. Kvothe implies that if he had the Mayor’s blessing he’d be able to get into all sorts of secret libraries and have a good poke around. Which you may recall was the entire reason Kvothe came to see the Mayor in the first place and since he found nothing in the murder forest, fairyland or Ninjatown except some names this means a good two thirds or so of the book were effectively pointless.

Since nothing in this trilogy can happen quickly the Mayor says he’ll “think on” Kvothe’s proposal nstead of just saying “right, off you go”. He tells Kvothe to come to his rooms later, so he can ask Kvothe a question in return. Be still, my heart.

 

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25 thoughts on “Let’s Read The Wise Man’s Fear ch. 136-137

  1. PaleAntiquarian

    Got to add on the medical stuff: even with the “raising the pus” thing, people in the middle ages were not this stupid. By the 12th century there was a respected medical manual circulating which can now be found translated to English as the Chirurgia of Roger Frugard. From what we can tell, a lot of his medical knowledge was observational rather than traditional, especially in physical rather than pharmaceutical treatment.

    I admit I only skimmed most of the manual (I was writing a seminar paper on medieval understanding and treatment of head trauma), but a few things relevant to this stuck out: the author was very much aware of the medical emergencies that could result from a broken bone pressing against internal organs, and on the importance of washing open wounds with as antiseptic a solution as you could get.

    That last bit he might not have fully understood himself, but he very pointedly instructed that wounds–especially head injuries where the protective tissue around the brain might be exposed–be washed with egg whites. With no good understanding of how to sterilize water, egg whites were the cleanest, least destructive liquid you could use. In fact, he admonished that for head injuries specifically, alcohol-based solutions shouldn’t be used.

    On the other hand, I made an effort to look up the known and verifiable medicinal effects of the plants and compounds he recommended for compresses, and most of them had no beneficial effects on wound healing. The most that the majority of them were good for was gastrointestinal problems, which indicates potentially the start of the process that got them touted as cure-alls.

    Despite how good Frugard was in general, it should be noted that the most widely-distributed version of the Chirurgia included annotations by another author, who was utter shite. Frugard made little to no mention of the humors or phases of the moon in his work, but they were all over the annotations.

    The same thing happened with the physician Galen and his texts, but to a more destructive degree: The people who passed on and transcribed his books kept only the “really important parts”, tossing out pretty much all of his surgical advancements in the process and leaving only the theoretical (and wrong) bits.

    I mention this because I can theoretically see why there’d be ignorant crap running about in ye generic fantasyland, even if stuff that demonstrably works has already been discovered. The only problem is that there’s no cultural indication of why that would be. The wizard school is just right all the time about everything, and everyone else doesn’t care. This isn’t how this shit works.

    If it was at all realistic to how people work (at least in medieval/renaissance Western Europe), the school would have a lot of Received Truths that you hewed to, which would be wrong as heck, at least in part because there was no understanding of how to test these things, nor why you would want to.

    But at least they bloody understood that broken ribs hurt.

    Reply
  2. Elspeth Grey

    This is pretty off-topic, but I’ve mainlined your Let’s Reads of both Rothfuss books in the past week and I wanted to let you know that you have made me determined to write a blog post explaining basic folklore to fantasy authors.

    They won’t read it, but hey it’ll be out there.

    Reply
  3. Satu

    Rothfuss knows so painflully little about human anatomy and physiology and medical science overall it gives me a nasty headache from all the tooth grinding I have to do reading this. If and when he doesn’t know anything at all about a subject, why can’t he consult someone who does, say, a doctor? It’s not uncommon for writers to do so as far as I know…

    So yeah, If Kvothe really had four broken ribs, he would be in very serious pain and unable to move at the very least. Yet he goes on shrugging, sighing deeply, grinning, snorting and waving his hands, as if he just got a bruise or two. Even one broken rib would leave him gasping painfully for breath and avoiding moving at all, and would take over a month to heal fully.

    And if we’re talking about complications, a broken rib can pierce the pleura, which is a layer of fibrous tissue surrounding lungs, and cause pneumothorax, i.e. air getting in and out from a hole in the pleura, creating a pocket of air between pleura and lung, which normally stick together via a small amount of lubricant fluid. A pneumothorax can cause a lung to collapse if the amount of air in the pleural cavity is big enough. This is very painful and makes it hard to breathe, but isn’t as such life-threatening. Letting the air out with a chest tube over a day or so usually fixes it. But you can also get a tension pneumothorax which means that air is getting in through the hole but not out. When breathing, more and more air gets in, starting to compress the lung and ultimately pushing it and the heart over to one side making it difficult for the heart to pump blood. This is life-threatening. Four broken ribs – if on the same side – would give him a flail chest as Ronan points out, and this means his whole ribcage would’ve become unstable and likely earn him a trip to the ICU and some surgery.

    It seems to be some sort of a by-product of modern, effective medicine that people like Rothfuss can’t even imagine what it would be like to be injured or seriously ill without the comforts of latest science to aid them. When Kvothe was whipped, for instance, he just got skin lacerations if I remember correctly. He got some stitches and was fine, apparently. In fact whipping often tended to cut muscles in addition to skin, sometimes to the bone, leaving the victim a bloody mess and life-long disability. You could even kill a man by whipping. Ofc this was not always the case, results varied depending on the type of whip used, amount of lashes given and the strength behind those strikes. But even with preadministered painkiller you most certainly wouldn’t just walk away, shrugging and grinning. And what would a drug preventing bleeding to the point that several long wounds wouldn’t bleed at all actually do to your circulation otherwise? If it promotes fast clotting then blood would begin to clot in his veins elsewhere as well, making extremities like finger and toes become gangrenous. Same thing if it were to cause extreme constricting of the arteries. And no, the effects can’t be restricted to merely your back or open wounds or whatever.

    And don’t even get me started on all that other shit he pulls in the book, which is either utter nonsense or way too advanced for Kvotheland.

    Rothfuss, if you do write the third book, just ASK someone, please.

    Reply
    1. ronanwills Post author

      “It seems to be some sort of a by-product of modern, effective medicine that people like Rothfuss can’t even imagine what it would be like to be injured or seriously ill without the comforts of latest science to aid them”

      This also ties into what I’ve said several times before, that no one in these books (or fantasy novels in general) ever has to worry about wounds becoming infected…. unless it’s convenient for them to do so. For example back when Kvothe was with the healer woman in the village she mentioned she was treating a guy whose leg had been crushed with some sort of herbal antiseptic to stop him getting “the rot”, but when Kvothe got stabbed with a piece of dirty glass on the streets of Tarbean there was never any mention of needing to clean out the cut.

      Reply
      1. Satu

        Yes, I remember. Also during the middle ages it was commony believed that it was necessary to “raise the pus” for a wound to heal properly. To get the process going a wound might be covered in manure for example. I’m not sure Kvotheland is medieval ( I have no clue what age it’s supposed to be, what with no steampower but knowledge of optics etc) but I’m quite sure they shouldn’t know about infection being essentially bad for you, let alone how to prevent or treat it. The whole scientific and medicinal knowledge of the world is hopelessly incongruos and illogical.

        Reply
      2. Satu

        But with the rot-talk it can’t be intentional to leave wounds be, so I guess Rothfuss just writes whatever seems to fit the situation.

        Reply
      3. braak

        @Satu: Hahah, yeah, I remember reading that Paracelsus (in the 17th century — pretty late in our medieval Kvotheland) enjoyed a lot of success as a doctor for his revolutionary theory of “not filling open wounds with cow shit.”

        Reply
      4. welltemperedwriter

        This reminds me of the wilderness survival course I took last summer and the very serious discussion we had about injury and infection. If you get lost in the back country and get hurt it’s very serious; by the time S&R finds you it may be too late.

        Reply
      5. Satu

        Oh, one more medical fact springs to mind about when Bast tries to look into Kvothe’s eyes and Kvothe brushes him off saying he’s not concussed: You can’t tell jack shit about concussion by looking into someone’s eyes. You only look into the eyes of a patient with a head injury to rule out an expanding process in the brain i.e swelling or bleeding. That often affects the cranial nerves which control eye movement and the dilation of the pupil and thus it’s informative to see if the eyes function normally or not. Kvothfuss has probably just watched the doctors on Grey’s Anatomy looking into a patient’s eyes and, not seeing anything odd, telling them “it’s probably just a mild concussion”. Easy to draw the wrong conclusion, which is why you should ASK and VERIFY when writing something like a novel.

        Reply
  4. zephyrean

    > Anyway Bast performs a mildly creepy magic spell thing to heal Kvothe’s injured tooth that involves basically taking the injury on himself (one of those rare bursts of creativity we’ve been seeing in the book)
    ¿¿¿What creativity? This bog-standard emo shit is *everywhere* in girl stuff. (It also rears its ugly head in gritty grimdark “realistic” fRPGs whose designers have a hate-on for magical healing and can’t understand that a game which thrives on smashed skulls and spilled entrails cannot continue without it. In actual play, someone gets regeneration, becomes the group’s designated masochist, and the whole mess is glossed over with “we heal to full”.)

    > The power level of wizards in this book is all over the place. Back at wizard school I got the impression that just manipulating the heat of a candle was quite an achievement, but now we’ve got Kvothe and [Caudicus] blowing multiple people away with magic, and neither of them have access to powers that other wizards don’t.
    I don’t think he went on a spell-slinging rampage like Kvothe in murderwoods. Surprising and killing four guys sounds plausible for a guy who has access to bullshit fantasy chemicals.

    > Bredon (it’s okay if you can’t remember who that is, don’t bother looking it up)
    That’s literally the most pointless character in the books (provided that Kvothe doesn’t get to compete for that dubious honor).

    > I swear to God this better not be going where I think it’s going.
    Bet you tenbux it does.

    @Signatus, “I hope Rothfuss has a good explanation as to why he is powerless and skill-less.”
    Kvothe swore by his name and powers and whatnot to not try to find out about Denna’s patron. He’s going to break that promise, then, arbitrary events will happen that will force him to retire and live under a pseudonym for incoherent and badly explained reasons, and *that*, in turn, will cause him to lose the powahs *and* make the at-least-Supes-had-glasses not-disguise effective, because that’s how truenaming works.

    Reply
    1. Signatus

      I forgot about that. XD
      Yes, that would explain tho why he lost his magic, as he swore over his power. But he never swore over his fighting skills which come from a totally different source. Power, as I see it, is the energy he uses to create magic.
      Swordfighting is something he learned, he worked hard to aquire, and is in no way related to the Alar (or whatever it is they call their magic source).

      If I swore over my driving skills, it would make no sense if I also became uncapable of cooking, as both things are totally unrelated, require different parts of my brain and have been learned in completely different ways.

      So if, by the third book, Rothfuss says he looses all his skills because he swore over his “power”, I’m going to call BS on him unless he gives me an incredibly good explanation (which, judging by his obsession with ridiculous subversions, he won’t).

      Reply
  5. katz

    I think he called his series The Kingkiller Chronicles so that people would just keep reading in hopes that someone would eventually kill a king and it would be interesting.

    Reply
  6. braak

    It is a good question why you’d kick someone in the shoulder. This, off the top of my head, actually seems like literally the least effective place to kick a person. It’s also a lot of work, compared to numerous other places to kick a person that might be more effective (knee, balls, stomach, liver, ribs, &c).

    Maybe we’re meant to think he was aiming for the guy’s head and just missed?

    Reply
    1. welltemperedwriter

      I was thinking the same thing. And it’s pretty hard to kick someone in the head, so that’s a reasonable assumption, but because it’s pretty hard to kick someone in the head I don’t see many people trying it until they’re into TKD or something.

      When I practice kicks it’s pretty much with the assumption that my target is hip-high or lower. Because, I’m short, with short legs, and aiming higher than that just seems like a bad idea. Maybe Kvothe is really tall?

      Reply
    2. CmdrBoreale

      Not to mention these guys are /soldiers/. I assume they have armour of some kind, why the hell would you be kicking for anywhere in the upper body, which is more than likely going to have the most armour?

      Reply
  7. Signatus

    “Anyway Bast performs a mildly creepy magic spell thing to heal Kvothe’s injured tooth that involves basically taking the injury on himself (one of those rare bursts of creativity we’ve been seeing in the book)”

    Actually, I’m pretty sure I’ve seen a machine that does exactly that in Babylon 5, and it is a recurrent spell in many games (use life force to heal others or to generate magicka, or something along the lines depending on the game), so I think it is yet another thing Rothfuss copied from his gaming experience.

    Anyways, even if Rothfuss made some sort of super twist and the innkeeper isn’t the real Qvothe (just someone impersonating him while he hides), or is actually just an exageration he created himself (he’s no such fighter, mage or ever slept with Felurian, he is just one heck of a liar and a pretty imaginative storyteller), it wouldn’t justify how bad these books are. Sure, as a twist it would be awesome (although I’m sure I’ve seen that before somewhere, I just can’t put my finger on it), but the books will still be plotless trainwrecks.
    A bad ending can ruin a good book, but a good ending can’t fix a bad book.

    To be honest, I don’t think he’ll go that way. I admit the only thing that made me read this second book was the ending where Qvothe didn’t have magic powers. I was intrigued as to why that happened.
    I hope Rothfuss has a good explanation as to why he is powerless and skill-less. I can understand the whole magic thing, maybe the connection with his magic powers, alar or whatever it is called, was cut down in a Dragon Age sort of way (the tranquils). But you don’t forget phisical habilities like fighting just like that, like you don’t just forget to ride your bicicle. I spent a whole year without getting on a horse and I had not forgotten how to ride (I was a bit clumsier during the first 15 minutes, tho).

    So either he comes with a really, really, really good explanation as to why that happens, or he’s going to get many raised eyebrows (or not, as most readers think this saga is brilliant).

    (I’m writing this comment as I read)

    There is some funny thing about this book, and it is how disjointed everything is. A decent writer would have made the evil wizard be a Chandrian or a Chandrian allied, or something along the lines. After he flees, Qvothe would have been sent along with the best warriors in the land to track and hunt him down, where it would be revealed that he was with the Chandrians. Upon bursting into the camp, the evil wizard would muster something, guiding Qvothe to Ademre, and there Qvothe would have to prove his prowess to access the secret knowledge of the Lethani (which could be more than a moral code, it could be ancient knowledge inherited from the Amyr, because Adem are descendant of the Amyr who are very much ancient, to defeat the Chandrian).
    Sure, it is not very original, I just pulled it out of my backside after several hours of playing Skyrim and it kind of shows, but at least it has a plot. What I mean to say is, there is no logic in the way events keep happening on this books. It makes no sense that Qvothe gets sent on some bullshit bandit hunting while the evil wizard with whatever evil motivations, gets hunted down by the townsguard only to be revealed 600 pages after the events.

    “Kvothe implies that if he had the Mayor’s blessing he’d be able to get into all sorts of secret libraries and have a good poke around. Which you may recall was the entire reason Kvothe came to see the Mayor in the first place”

    To be honest, I had completely forgotten. It’s not that the books are too long, it is that they sway from one way to another without effectively centering anywhere into something resembling a plot, that I simply lost interest and kept reading by inertia. It is funny how I can remember subtle details from Harry Potter over 13 years after I read the first books, and here I have a hard time remembering basic things. I do remember tho his red hair, his eyes that change color and how poor he is, because it’s the only friggin’ thing the book focuses in.

    Reply
    1. Austin H. Williams

      “It’s not that the books are too long, it is that they sway from one way to another without effectively centering anywhere into something resembling a plot, that I simply lost interest and kept reading by inertia.

      I think you’ve both tapped into this book’s greatest weakness and the primary reason behind its success.

      Because, I mean, obviously if it just keeps you reading, it has to be a good book, right?

      Reply
      1. Signatus

        To be honest, I hate leaving books unfinished, so even if it takes me 4 months, I’ll try to finish a book. XD

        But yes, it is not a terribly boring book… well, it is, pages and pages of Qvothe moaning about money and trying to solve his money issues is not interesting.
        But there is action… well, not, there really isn’t much action as most action sequences are spaced out and anticlimatic (and not very well written, but I would forgive Rothfuss if the book could be saved from other sides because I know how hard action scenes are to write).

        To be honest, I don’t know why people like this book. 😛
        Maybe it’s the POV, same as with Twilight, it helps the reader relate, somehow, or get inmersed in the story. Maybe this book wouldn’t have gotten the same response had it been written in third person (although I think Rothfuss does a slightly better job at third person… when he doesn’t stuff purple prose down our throats).

        Reply
      2. Austin H. Williams

        “Maybe it’s the POV, same as with Twilight, it helps the reader relate, somehow, or get inmersed in the story.”

        This is the closest thing to an actual explanation as to Kingkiller’s Chronicle’s popularity that I’ve ever heard .I remember first coming across this on <a href="http://requireshate.wordpress.com/2012/09/14/fanboy-fallacies-twilight-is-shit-but-jimpatrich-rothjordan-is-amazing/"Requires Hate, but unfortunately, there are few fanbois forthcoming to corroborate this.

        Reply

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