Monthly Archives: July 2014

[Guest Post] Let’s Play Gemini Rue Pt. 1

[Welcome to Let’s Play Gemini Rue! This series is being written by my brother, who you may remember from his critically acclaimed post on Almost Human. Please direct all angry comments and typo notifications to his email address at ronansbrother@omgemail.com]

This blog is about books, right? Right! But books are old-fashioned. Boring, even. It’s about time we here at Doing In The Wizard blasted off into the 21st century!

To that end, I will now commence a Let’s Read Play of a future-vision graphical adventure story, or ‘inter-vidcon game’. The format will be more-or-less what you’re used to, with each post in the series covering a small section of the inter-vidcon game we’re currently playing. However, because inter-vidcon games aren’t conductive to quotes (or even Kvothes), I will instead be leveraging hyper-futuristic screenshots and, should the situation warrant it, internet video clips. This is going to be a veritable smorgasbord of cutting-edge blog technology.

Are you ready? Are you excited? Because I sure am!

gemini rue

LET’S PLAY GEMINI RUE

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His Dark Materials

his-dark-materials-everymans

Back when I was a wee person I discovered Phillip Pullman’s Northern Lights (released as The Golden Compass in the US) and absolutely loved it to pieces. Then I found the The Subtle Knife in a library and didn’t read it for ages because I didn’t realize it was a sequel. By the time The Amber Spyglass came along I was fully on board the parallel-dimensions-secular-humanism-war-against-heaven train and the His Dark Materials trilogy ranked among my all time favourite books.

That was a long time ago though, and I haven’t re-read all three books in quite a while. So I decided, why not blatantly rip off Ferretbrain’s Reading Canary format and do a mega-post on them, with brief detours to cover the movie and the two companion novellas Pullman put out? The aim will be to expose the books to the light of cold, objective analysis and discover if they’re actually as good as I remember them being.

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